Architecture

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Bathhouse Williamsburg

Bathhouse Williamsburg

Housed in a 1930s soda factory in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, the Bathhouse brings communal bathing to the borough. Guests enter into a sleek reception area, fitted with handmade cement tiles and a custom concrete walkway. A 6,500 square foot subterranean bathhouse is located below where traditional rituals meet modern techniques. Situated among the original brickwork and vaulted ceilings are a variety of treatments including thermal pools, cedar-wood saunas, and a celestial steam room. Massages, stretching, scrubs, and cryotherapy are performed in rooms around the perimeter while a private ritual room is located in the 100-foot tall brick smokestack. On the building’s ground floor, a restaurant and bar offers an all-day menu featuring Northern and Eastern European-inspired cuisine and classic cocktails, served in a bright dining room dripping in plants.

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York House

York House

Using geometric shapes in a unique manner is somewhat of a trademark for Russian architect Alex Nerovnya, and the York House puts that signature style on full display. Placed on a slight incline, the forest dwelling features a simple gable roof. A central core houses four guest bedrooms, dividing the living spaces in two while giving the traditional form an original update. Interiors are lined in warm wood paneling and a glazed facade highlights views of the landscape. To further connect to nature, integrated sliding glass doors open to a series of multi-leveled terraces that lead down to the forest floor.

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Verdon Balconies

Verdon Balconies

With its steep limestone walls, France’s Verdon Gorge is a bucket list item for may rock climbers around the world. The river canyon’s cliffs reach over 2,000 feet making it a destination for multi-pitch climbing. To offer these climbers a resting spot, Christophe Benichou designed the Verdon Balconies. Inspired by portaledge structures, these metal perches would be suspended from the rock as a place to take a break or even sleep while being sheltered from the wind and falling stones. Their lightweight construction allows for easy removal in the future.

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The Interlock

The Interlock

London’s Riding House Street hosts a range of architectural styles although, all of the buildings do share a common trait — a brick facade. Not to disrupt the aesthetic, The Interlock does adopt the traditional exterior while presenting it a contemporary way. The five-story building swaps the classic brickwork dimensions for a collection of 44 misshapen, clay blocks. Each one was set into 14 hand-crafted steel molds and fired in oxidation to create the matt blue finish. Totaling 5,000 pieces, their unconventional pattern creates a 3D effect that morphs as people pass by. Internally, the mixed-use development houses three residential units, a café, and a gallery. Taking a more light, airy approach, the interior features white-washed walls, oak flooring, and bathrooms finished in terrazzo.

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One-Third House

One-Third House

Built in the mountains of Norway, the One-Third House is designed to expand. The main living space is a traditional two-story cabin with a footprint that measures just over 500 square feet. While the modest dwelling offers cozy accommodations for a young couple, the pair wanted room to grow. The solution was an open-air veranda. Double the size of the main house, the uninsulated area extends from the home with a shared roof. Tilted glulam columns give the space supports and a more modern, industrial design while also framing in views of the dramatic landscape. Although it currently functions as anything from a storage room and garage to a workshop and banquet hall, it can easily be transformed into additional living space in the future.

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House in the Landscape

House in the Landscape

Organic architecture was first coined by Frank Lloyd Wright nearly a century ago. Although the practice isn’t new, Niko Architecture offers a fresh take on the philosophy with the House in the Landscape. The dwelling lives in harmony with its environment, appearing to emerge from the artificial landscape like a sculpted boulder. To further integrate the exterior into the surroundings, a green roof is planted with woody and herbaceous species. Floor-to-ceiling glazing keeps a constant connection between the interior and the outdoors by offering expansive views. The windows also expand the living spaces to a terrace where a free-flowing infinity pool mimics a natural body of water.

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Filux Art Laboratory

Filux Art Laboratory

The city of Merida has a rich colonial heritage that has evolved into the cultural heart of the Yucatán Peninsula. Fusing together its past and present, Workshop architects have created the Filux Art Laboratory for the International Festival of Lights Mexico. The event space occupies a former colonial house. Many of the structure’s historic features have been left untouched, serving as an antique backdrop for contemporary exhibition and art pieces. On the central terrace, intricate lattice around the exterior casts light and shadows on the building creating a light exhibit of its own.

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Hood Cliff Retreat

Hood Cliff Retreat

Sited on a wooded bluff overlooking the canal, the Hood Cliff Retreat replaces a 1962 cedar cabin in the Pacific Northwest. The new structure consists of a flat-roofed dwelling built on the existing footprint, an addition, and a bunkhouse. Opposed to the original cabin, the current home breaks up its rough-sawn cedar facade with panels of glazing for a deeper connection to the outdoors. Reclaimed beams and siding have been repurposed in the interior as countertops and cladding. The salvaged materials combine with pine plywood walls and ceilings and cast-concrete to create a warm, inviting atmosphere. While celestial windows and floor-to-ceiling glass flood the living spaces with natural light, they also bring in views of the surrounding flora and fauna for a nature-minded family. The inside seamlessly flows to the exterior terraces where oversized eaves offer shelter for viewing the native killdeer bird.

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Sirdal Twin Cabins

Sirdal Twin Cabins

Situated on a hilltop in Norway, the Sirdal Twin Cabins offer a winter refuge for the nearby slopes. The two structures are made from asymmetrical forms. A steeply sloped roofline blocks the harsh winter winds on one side while creating a sheltered south-facing terrace on the other. Opposite of the exterior’s darkly stained timber facade, the interior is lined with warm pine paneling. Solid pine flooring complete the simplified palette throughout the opening living space. To take advantage of the alpine setting, strategically placed windows frame in views of the surrounding landscape.

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The Whale Arctic Pavilion

The Whale Arctic Pavilion

Just North of the Arctic circle rests the Norwegian island of Andøya lies Andenes. Known for its high population of migrating whales, the location is a prime spot for viewing the marine mammals and to celebrate the creatures, Dorte Mandrup designed The Whale. The upcoming arctic attraction is located on the island’s rocky coastline. Its rolling roofline integrates itself into the shore while also resembling one of the breaching giants. Its interior will be occupied by exhibition spaces, offices, a cafe, and a store aimed at bringing awareness and protecting aquatic wildlife through art, science, and architecture. While roaming around inside, visitors will also experience dramatic views of the landscape along with glimpses of the passing whales. The pavilion is expected to open in 2022.

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