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Curve Appeal 3D-Printed House

Curve Appeal 3D-Printed House

As 3D printing has evolved, the projects have become more and more ambitious. Case in point: the Curve Appeal 3D-Printed House. Designed by WATG, the 1,000-square-foot residence will be printed using Branch Tecnchology’s freeform process, making it the first of its kind. The home features a sweeping curved exterior that is not only easy on the eyes but also provides structural stability. Its interior takes inspiration from the Case Study Houses of the 1950s offering a modernist aesthetic with an open concept and a glazed facade that floods the interior with natural light while creating a constant connection with the outdoors. Along with its revolutionary construction, the structure will take advantage of innovative technologies like solar carving and passive mechanical systems to make it net-zero-energy. The project will break ground later this year in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

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Calcaire House

Calcaire House

Backed by the Rocky Mountains, the Calcaire House is a modern Colorado compound fitting of the surrounding Boulder landscape. A steel and limestone entry is guarded by a pair of towering, mature elm trees. The gabled silhouette is continued throughout the home’s network of interlocking volumes. Low stone partitions are placed around the interior’s open living spaces, creating a sense of division among the towering vaulted ceilings. The centerpiece of the gathering room is a double-sided fireplace. Sitting on a honed limestone hearth, panels of steel extend to the ceiling to shape the massive showpiece. Sliding doors flank the fireplace, turning the room into an open-air pavilion that seamlessly transitions to a side courtyard. The outdoor space is a prime spot for taking in the scenery, offering views of both the wooded lot and Bear Peak in the distance.

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CDLR House

CDLR House

Many homes attempt to blend into their surroundings but the CDLR House takes the idea one step further. Aside from its green roof and black exterior, the concrete structure used dead trees found on the property to imprint its facade and hide among the Mexican forest. Its Y-shape is nestled into the existing vegetation, offering unique views in every direction. Large glazed panels cap each wing, framing in the landscape while ensuring natural light flows throughout the interior. Exposed concrete was left raw on the inside, pairing with wood ceilings to create a warm backdrop for the selection of mid-century modern furnishings. At the center of the home is a living pavilion. The open-air room provides a protected space for outdoor entertaining or lounging within views of the lake below.

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Shapeshifter House

Shapeshifter House

Rising from the sandy terrain like a desert mirage, the Shapeshifter House is a sculpted extension of the Nevada landscape. The home was built for a pair of art collectors. Its angular exterior reflects their love for contemporary art while its mounded zinc facade blends into the surrounding environment. Internally, exposed zinc panels overlap to form the ceiling, creating a shiny contrast to the polished concrete floors. Contemporary artworks adorn the bare concrete walls and large glazed panels frame in the local vegetation. The upper level houses the master bedroom. Cantilevering over the ground below, the glazed room is afforded extensive views of Reno and the Sierra Nevada mountains beyond.

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Charbonniere House

Charbonniere House

Overlooking the St. Lawrence River, the Charbonniere House is ingrained into a mountainside in the Charlevoix region of Québec. Its charred cedar exterior follows the terrain, creating a series of volumes arranged around a central courtyard. From the road, a lack of windows gives the structure a monolithic presence. Upon entry, the somber facade fades into a dreamy, rustic interior created by stone floors and white planked walls mixed with an abundance of natural light. While the front of the home is opaque, its rear is fitted with large panels of glazing. The black frame windows open the inside to the outdoors, affording expansive views of the pristine riverscape ahead.

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By the Way House

By the Way House

The By the Way House sits in the Polish countryside overlooking a nearby river. Rather than drawing inspiration from the pristine landscape, the home takes its shape from an unconventional entity — its long, winding driveway. The concrete road twists and turns around the property not to disturb any of the existing trees. At the middle of the site, the driveway lifts off the terrain, folding itself into a two-story dwelling. The solid material forms the ceiling, walls, and roof, giving the structure a sculpted quality that stands out from the verdant landscape like a modernist statue while a minimalist interior is housed within. The facade eventually unravels into a pathway off of the main living area that leads to the nearby beach.

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Bach Family House

Bach Family House

Like a modern campsite, a small group of timber buildings forms the Bach Family House. The rural retreat is situated on a small plot in Hanmer Springs, New Zealand. The three timber cabins are organized around a central terrace with the largest one containing the main living area as well as a kitchen, bedroom, and utility area while additional sleeping quarters and a kitchenette are housed next door. The tower-like volume stores firewood in the bottom level and bunkhouse above. All of the structures have direct access to the communal patio. Featuring a dining table and fire pit looking out onto Hanmer Plain and the Tekoa Range, the outdoor space acts as a gathering spot for extended family visits.

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Casa Gozu

Casa Gozu

Mimicking the folds in the mountainous backdrop, the Casa Gozu blends into the Colombian landscape with a palette of stone, metal, and wood. The home is comprised of two wings joined by a glazed walkway. Taking on a V-shape, the common areas face the east while the private rooms look toward the west. The natural palette finds its way into the interior where the addition of floor-to-ceiling windows creates a constant connection with the surrounding scenery. Externally, multiple terraces create outdoor living spaces to take in views of the valley below.

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Twist Farmhouse

Twist Farmhouse

Designed by Tom Givone, an abstract addition makes the Twist Farmhouse a surrealist art piece. The original structure is a 1800s farmhouse sited in rural Pennsylvania. The project called for a complete renovation of the existing home as well as an extension. While the home’s traditional form maintains intact, the curvy shape of the new construction is inspired by the owner’s family bond, looking as if a gravitational field was pulling it toward her childhood home across the street. Internally, salvaged timber floors and vintage fixtures live harmoniously with modern furniture and unusual window shapes, carrying on the exterior’s unique mix of old and new.

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Palm Springs Desert House

Palm Springs Desert House

Palm Spring is synonymous with mid-century designs. Although it was built in the present, the Palm Springs Desert House still exudes what we love from the past. The home is guarded by an eight-foot concrete wall. Within the border is a private courtyard with a pool. While the interior is modest, this protected area creates an indoor/outdoor living experience that nearly quadruples the internal square footage. Large expanses of glazing between the steel frames draw in the views of the surrounding mountains while seamlessly connecting the inside to the exterior patio. Washed in white, the clean lines and minimalist offerings of the modern structure pop against the desert landscape.

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