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ZeroCabin Off-Grid Shelter

ZeroCabin Off-Grid Shelter

Enjoying nature without disrupting it: that’s the idea behind ZeroCabin. The Chilean-based company has created a kit offering self-sustaining, zero impact timber dwellings that truly live harmoniously with Mother Nature. The shelter operates completely off-grid with solar panels, water treatment systems, and rainwater collection and purification systems. Elevated on a foundation of wooden stilts, each cabin is angled for maximum sun exposure to help generate energy from the photovoltaic cells while its timber frame features biodegradable insulation and thermal windows for efficient use of heating and cooling. Internally, warm, minimal living spaces are placed behind expansive glazing to create a comfortable retreat to admire the landscape of your choice.

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Cyberhouse

Cyberhouse

If the 1,800-square-foot Cybunker is too compact for your dystopian future, Russian design firm Modern Houses has another option. The Cyberhouse is an apocalyptic dream home offering 3,230 square feet of living space and a full system of protective features. Inspired by Elon Musk’s Cybertruck, the sleek, angular exterior is made from a steel and concrete shell while its two-story interior is guarded from zombies or a nuclear threat by a drawbridge gate, airlock doors, and armored windows. There’s also space to park your Tesla inside a subterranean level with elevator access. Although the dwelling provides a safe refuge for seven occupants comfortably, it can take on up to 10 survivors if you’re feeling generous. The project started out as just a concept but after a proposal, there’s now a base price of $865,000.

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Takamatsu House

Takamatsu House

Some cars, like the Maserati GranTurismo, are considered a work of art. So rather than lock away their ride in a dingy garage, a couple in Japan wanted to display it like the masterpiece it is. Alongside the main living area, Fujiwaramuro Architects placed a glass wall to showcase the automobile for the interior. Its white paint job even adds the sleek, monochromatic aesthetic found throughout the all-white internal spaces. Located in Takamatsu, privacy and size was also the main goal. To maximize its footprint, the dwelling takes on a cubed form and for a sense of security, its geometric exterior is free of any expansive glazing. Instead, the house is wrapped in long, thin windows while overhead voids in the center and in all four corners welcome in natural light.

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Aspen Ridge House

Aspen Ridge House

Running parallel to the Rocky Mountains, the Aspen Ridge House offsets the rugged scenery with a contemporary design. The dwelling was originally built in 1968 and is now a masterful combination of old and new. Spreading horizontally across a ridgeline. its modern form sits behind a series of remnant stone walls. Dark gray metal siding extends from the stone to form the exterior’s western facade. Internally, timber beams, wood-clad walls, and wood flooring run throughout the home, adding a rustic warmth to the interior’s modern finishes while existing wood-burning fireplaces were salvaged to pay homage to the structure’s former life. Throughout the living spaces, rooms are furnished with new and antique pieces as well as contemporary works of art that hang alongside expansive views of the surroundings.

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Interstellar Lab EBIOS Facility

Interstellar Lab EBIOS Facility

Getting to Mars is one thing, living there is another. To help astronauts prepare for life on the Red Planet, Interstellar Lab has plans for an Experimental Bio-Regenerative Station here on Earth. The Paris-based has worked with NASA to develop water treatment and plant growth systems for the EBIOS — a self-sustaining, carbon-neutral village that can house up to 100 people within its interlocking domes. To get the most authentic Mars experience, the compound will be located in the Mojave Desert where the conditions closely resemble those millions of miles away. The project plans to begin in 2021 and once completed, the facility will operate as a science and research center for six months and then will welcome tourists for the remainder of the year.

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Chelsea Townhouse

Chelsea Townhouse

Nestled among a row of six historic buildings built by Clement Clark Moore, the Chelsea Townhouse has been restored to its former glory. Lang Architecture has breathed new life into the heritage building by transforming its eleven, neglected single room residences into a sophisticated single-family dwelling. Throughout its five floors, existing details have been salvaged and now live harmoniously with modern elements for a space that is both elegant and timeless. The rear of the home is now opened up with a wall of floor-to-ceiling windows in the kitchen and parlor level above. While illuminating the interior with warm, natural light, the glazed facade also affords views of the courtyard and street below.

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Kiht’han Floodwater House

Kiht’han Floodwater House

Sited adjacent to a coastal pond and the ocean in Sagaponack, New York, the Kiht’han Floodwater House is prone to flooding. Instead of letting it negatively impact their design, Bates Masi + Architects used the periodic rising waters as inspiration for a modern dwelling. The home, along with the pool, decks, and sanitary field, is elevated off the ground. Living spaces have been divided among a series of connected vertical volumes to allow water to flow around them. Perched above the ground, each room is afforded views of the wetlands and the sea through thoughtfully placed glazed panels while the remainder of the home is clad in board and batten wood siding. The choice of facade not only complements the local vernacular but also filter through water and light. For a smooth visual progression from the exterior, wood-clad interior walls on the first floor reproduce the external siding and transition into wainscoting and light walls on the upper level. The neutral palette creates a warm, airy atmosphere to take in the coastal scenery.

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Logo Houses

Logo Houses

Inspiration can come from anywhere and the Logo Houses are an impressive example of that. Consisting of four structures, the concrete and glass designs transform famous brand logos into modern homes. The first dwelling is the Trihouse, a three-dimensional triangular structure made from three slanted concrete stripes resembling the iconic footwear company. Between each bar is a glass element that floods the four-story interior with natural light. Floating on the water, a second home dubbed the Crosshouse takes cues from the American motor division with its bowtie silhouette while the Rhombhouse contains four stories within its diamond-shaped exterior. The final project is the Pyrahouse. Shaped like a pyramid, the house conceals private areas with an opaque facade and exposes and expansive living area through a pair of translucent shapes.

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Indigo Cabins

Indigo Cabins

Simple doesn’t have to be dull or boring. Woonpioniers proves that with their custom Indigo Cabins. The 861-square-foot prefab dwelling combines minimalist design and eco-friendly materials with a classic gabled form and a timber facade. Its interior is finished out with polished concrete floors and warm pinewood cladding on the walls and curved ceiling, creating an atmosphere that is both modern and cozy. Although its footprint is compact, it maximizes living space by placing a sleeping loft above an open-concept kitchen, living room, and bathroom while a full wall of glazing supplies natural light and expansive views of the chosen setting for both levels.

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Cybunker

Cybunker

The future is unpredictable. Whether we live out our days in a dystopian Earth or on a foreign planet, an off-grid residence like The Cybunker would come in handy. The modular shelter is made from an aerodynamic frame and steel monocoque shell that has the ability to withstand harsh environmental conditions while a circular infrastructure keeps it self-sufficient. A pair of folding doors open to a 600-foot depot to store vehicles, like that Tesla Cybertruck you impulsively pre-ordered, and it can also double as an airlock for safe entry and exit. Inside, an 1,800-square-foot space is a sleek, modern place to wait out the apocalypse that features a loft and armored glass windows. Although it is the ideal doomsday bunker, it can also function for the present as an isolated cabin or futuristic storage space.

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